7-Eleven waves farewell to winter with Salvation Army Thrift Store

A 7-Eleven product giveaway that gives back to the community

Vancouver PR company Peak Communicators is helping promote 7-Eleven’s new initiative to welcome summer – the “So Long, Winter!” campaign.

The stores have partnered with the Salvation Army Thrift Store for a promotion on May 14, where people can donate their used winter clothing and get a free Slurpee in return.

Created with 7-Eleven’s advertising agency, 123W, the clothing drive is being promoted on Facebook and Twitter, through social media and in an e-blast to customers.

7-Eleven has also developed an Instagram challenge around the day, whereby people take a selfie wearing all the clothing they’re donating with the hashtag #solongwinter. The winner gets a year or free Slurpees. A radio campaign and community cruisers will also also raise awareness of the event.

The Salvation Army Thrift Store is running its own PR to promote the initiative simultaneously.

The hope is that this will boost Slurpees’ visibility, as well as helping 7-Eleven give back to the community.

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