Andrew Simon leaving DDB, Mackie and Rossetto take creative lead

After nine years with the agency, Andrew Simon is leaving his role as executive creative director of DDB Toronto for what he calls “an amazing opportunity that comes along once in a lifetime.” Simon isn’t yet saying what his exact plans are, only that he’s assuming new responsibilities with an independent agency in a partnership […]

After nine years with the agency, Andrew Simon is leaving his role as executive creative director of DDB Toronto for what he calls “an amazing opportunity that comes along once in a lifetime.”

Simon isn’t yet saying what his exact plans are, only that he’s assuming new responsibilities with an independent agency in a partnership role. His last day at DDB Toronto is Sept. 17.

“I love DDB and collectively we’ve done some great things,” said Simon. “I wouldn’t leave for anything that wasn’t truly special.”

David Leonard, president and chief operating officer of DDB Canada, said Simon would be missed, referring to him as a “rare breed of creative director.”

“If you closed your eyes in a meeting [him] you wouldn’t know if he was an agency guy or [client] one of very few creative directors that are more well-rounded than just being a pure creative talent,” said Leonard.

Todd Mackie and Denise Rossetto, the creative team behind the agency’s recent award-winning campaign for the Canadian Cancer Society as well as efforts for Subaru Canada and Capital One, have been promoted to co-creative director positions.

Leonard said the transition would be relatively simple for Mackie and Rossetto who have both been with the agency for six years, most recently as associate creative directors.

“Their roles will be redefined but it’s not as if they don’t understand clients or the way we do business,” he said.

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