Guess who’s on a team for the next Amazing Race Canada?

Extreme Group CCO Shawn King and his wife in season two of the CTV series

Amazing Race contestants Jen and Shawn King.

As president and chief creative officer of Halifax’s Extreme Group, Shawn King is used to being behind the screen. But come this summer, he’s hitting the small screen. King and his wife Jen are one of 11 teams competing on season two of CTV’s The Amazing Race Canada. He spoke with Marketing about the experience.

On why they applied to be on The Amazing Race Canada

We’re probably like a lot of people—we’re fans of the show and you’re watching it on the couch saying, “We could totally do this.” So then we said let’s go for it. Why the hell not?

On how they reacted to being chosen…

It’s quite a process leading up to it, so you start to have some sense that it could be a possibility. But when you finally find out, it’s kind of overwhelming. And you start to question what you got yourself into because you don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s quite an overwhelming feeling.

On how their teenage son reacted…

He’s 17 so when we told him we were going to audition he said, “you’re not going to make it.” And when we told him we got it, all he said was, “You’d better win.”

On what he was worried about the most…

For me, I was a little worried about eating anything crazy. We assumed we would probably not be some of the youngest people there [Shawn is 41, Jen is 40], so what kind of physical challenges might be tough for us, but we did our best to prepare for that. Fear of the unknown was probably the biggest thing.

On what he was most excited about…

Almost the same thing. Not knowing what’s coming up and being excited about being able to see places you may not get to travel to and do things you might not normally get to do. That is a pretty cool opportunity.

On the most challenging part of the competition…

Being away and being in a bubble for the time that you are is pretty difficult. You’re basically sequestered from the world, so that was tough. Not being able to call home.

On how he and his wife did as a team…

We’ve been together a long time. We knew that we were going to argue, but that’s all on the surface. When you’re with someone this long, you start to just know how to interpret each other. You can team up to do things and really not even talk about it and find a way of working together. So we did a bit of that and we argued a bit. I don’t know what it will look like when it airs, but we came out of it closer than when we went into it, which is good.

On whether or not he’s worried about how he and Jen will be portrayed…

Worried is probably too strong a word. I would say anxious. We have no idea what it’s going to look like, so there’s a part of us that hopes we didn’t make fools of ourselves or say anything we’re going to regret.

On what they’d do with $250,000 cash prize if they won…

That we actually fought about… Paying for college tuition was probably the one thing we didn’t argue about. We got as far as paying down debt and paying for our son’s college and after that it was a bit of a back and forth discussion, to put it politely.

 

The Amazing Race Canada airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m., beginning July 8 on CTV and CTV GO.  

 

 

 

 

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