Look At This: When apple pie and maple syrup meet

Far from your typical announcement ad, a tax law firm uses iconic food to create awareness of its new U.S.-licensed lawyers

A new campaign for specialty law firm Morris Kepes Winters LLP pairs iconic national Canadian and American symbols to help illustrate that the firm has hired two more U.S.-licensed attorneys at its Toronto office.

Rather than a ho-hum insert-corporate-head-shot-and-bio-here announcement ad, dougserge+partners came up with the idea of combining maple syrup and apple pie in a print ad to signify the tax law firm’s expansion and its mix of Canadian and American lawyers.
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The campaign—the first ad campaign the law firm has ever done—also included a unique direct mail component that featured a wooden box containing a real apple pie and Morris Kepes Winters-branded bottle of maple syrup and was sent to a select list of clients.

The campaign also features elevator advertising, and print and digital ads are running in legal and accounting trade publications. The campaign will run until the end of this month. Media was handled by Denneboom.

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