Mark Francolini joins Cheil Canada

Mark Francolini has joined Cheil Canada’s Toronto office as SVP, executive creative director to focus on the Samsung account. Francolini most recently served as Young & Rubicam’s creative director. He held the same title at Zulu Alpha Kilo for five years, working with big name clients including Bell Canada, Audi and Coca-Cola. “Mark is a […]

Mark Francolini has joined Cheil Canada’s Toronto office as SVP, executive creative director to focus on the Samsung account.

Mark Francolini

Francolini most recently served as Young & Rubicam’s creative director. He held the same title at Zulu Alpha Kilo for five years, working with big name clients including Bell Canada, Audi and Coca-Cola.

“Mark is a crucial addition to the Cheil team,” said agency president Matt Cammaert, in a release. “His experience, insight, understanding of the new world, and his innate desire to build were all aspects of a year – long conversation we have had.”

Cheil is currently looking to add additional senior-level creative talent to its team.

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