Mony1

Montana’s meaty foray into video marketing

123W's meat-for-service spot marks a change for Cara brand

Montana’s Cookhouse knew it would be a risky move attempting to barter its barbeque menu items for services such as yoga and new pair of shoes.

Fortunately the stunt – pulled off with the help of Vancouver agency 123W – not only worked, but also provided the restaurant chain with enough video content to air over the coming weeks in movie theatres, on television and across social media.

“We wanted to see if the barbeque alone was great enough to produce the ads, so letting the product speak for itself. It was a big risk, but a big reward, we think,” says Chelsea Kellock, Montana’s brand manager.

Montana’s hired a camera crew to show up unexpectedly at various small businesses in Toronto over two days and offer a plate of BBQ meat in exchange for goods and services. While a couple of businesses declined, Kellock says the bartering team got about a dozen takers, everything from a psychic reading and yoga lesson to a haircut and a massage.

The ads will be airing in cinemas across Canada later this week for about a month, and on TSN for the next two months. Longer versions of each encounter, captured entirely on video, will be released on Montana’s Facebook page and on Twitter, Kellock said.

What’s more, the production crew from OPC Family Style and 123W each also agreed to take part of their payment for their work in barbecue menu items and gift certificates. Kellock wouldn’t say what percentage of the payment was in meat, but that both companies were open to the idea.

It was the first time Montana’s worked with 123W and marked its first major foray into video. Kellock says Montana’s ads have historically been on radio, but they wanted to change it up.

“This was a big jump for us, moving to a visual medium,” she says. “As we developed this positioning around our food, the core of which is around barbecue, we felt that showing off our food visually was key.”

It was also the first time Montana’s, and its parent company Cara, have done this style of advertising.

“We think the unscripted route was kind of a risky but fun approach,” Kellock says.

Montana’s claims its ads are “possibly the world’s first ad campaign paid for in meat.” In a statement the restaurant chain says, “Forget about Bitcoins, meat is much more widely accepted.”

Advertising Articles

Interac brings back the stubborn Holiday Bill

New Zulu Alpha Kilo spots show Bill badgering people where they shop

BMO unveils first campaign from Y&R

A new, employee-built tagline is designed for Canadian and U.S. markets

Cossette sale could bring new international player to Canada

Chinese firm BlueFocus is eager to expand in North America

Supermarket chain battles criticism over World War I ad

Sainsbury's four-minute television spot depicts the 1914 Christmas Truce

Celebrating innovative Canadian charity marketing

Shortlisted entries in the charity and not-for-profit category of the 2014 MIAs

Alain Tadros elected to lead AAPQ board of directors

The Quebec-based industry association elects new board for 2014-15

Amnesty International takes Canadians for a trip

Campaign microsite takes a closer look at the human rights crisis in Mexico

Agency Wars V: Sonya Furdyk vs. Sabrina Hashmi

The industry's annual fundraiser is back

Marketing Hall of Legends reveals finalists for Marketer on the Rise award

Award identifies and celebrates the marketing leaders of tomorrow