Tim Hortons takes to Twitter to promote ‘The Priestley’

A sitcom gag about the ubiquitous presence of Tim Hortons has inspired the company to create a suitably outlandish doughnut. A recent episode of City’s How I Met Your Mother featured a cameo by Canadian star Jason Priestley, who boasted of a confection he dubbed “The Priestley.” It’s a Tim Hortons Timbit crammed into a […]

A sitcom gag about the ubiquitous presence of Tim Hortons has inspired the company to create a suitably outlandish doughnut.

A recent episode of City’s How I Met Your Mother featured a cameo by Canadian star Jason Priestley, who boasted of a confection he dubbed “The Priestley.”

It’s a Tim Hortons Timbit crammed into a strawberry-vanilla doughnut.

Tim Hortons has since taken to Twitter to praise the episode and reveal what such a concoction would look like.

The photo appears to show a chocolate Timbit inside a jam-filled vanilla doughnut with icing and sprinkles on top.

A spokesperson was not immediately available to comment, or reveal whether the treat would be added to the cafe’s menu.

“We loved the idea of ‘The Priestley’ so much, we made a batch,” the company says in a tweet and photo posted Tuesday afternoon.

“A Timbit IN a doughnut? Genius.”

Monday’s episode of  How I Met Your Mother featured a cavalcade of Canadian stars including Luc Robitaille, Steven Page, k.d. lang, Geddy Lee, Alex Trebek, Alan Thicke and Paul Shaffer.

They pop up when recurring character Barney Stinson, played by Neil Patrick Harris, travels to Canada to learn more about his Canadian girlfriend Robin Scherbatsky, played by real-life Canuck actress Cobie Smulders.

He discovers a country obsessed with Tim Hortons doughnuts, as revealed by a faux documentary in which Priestley claims to have invented “The Priestley.”

Advertising Articles

Blacks embarks on a journey fueled by life’s special moments

Retailer targets snap-happy moms in new advertising campaign from Cossette

Ads You Must See: April 17, 2015

MetLife helps parents prepare for the future. Hyundai writes love letters in the sand

It’s election season. Let the boring ads begin (Column)

Headspace's Eric Blais explains why mad men deserve a spot in the political ad game

On The Move: New hires at RBC, Match and North Strategic

A weekly recap of who's headed where in Canadian marketing and communications

Spotify introduces playlist targeting

New service will enable advertisers to target listeners by mood, activity

Cundari launches non-profit funding tool

Agency gives a public platform to smaller charities lacking marketing funds

Tourisme Montréal kisses its old branding goodbye

New logo signals a change in marketing strategy that takes a "younger approach"

Environics strengthens creative team with new hires

Julie Martinson and Ella Potyrala-Singleton join as associate creative directors.

OpenTable selects first Canadian AOR

Toronto-based StrategicAmpersand tasked with building brand's social presence