AMA Toronto launches fifth Mentor Exchange

Applications now being accepted for 10-month program

The American Marketing Association’s Toronto Chapter is accepting mentee applications for its Mentor Exchange program.

The 10-month program, now entering its fifth year, seeks to match 50 Canadian c-suite executives from agencies, client organizations, media companies and educational institutions with up-and-coming senior marketers and business leaders.

“Most strong senior executives and leaders will tell you how important a Mentor was in their careers,” said Dr. Alan Middleton, executive director of the Schulich Executive Education Centre, in a statement. “It is the third leg on the stool of formal education/training, work experience and experiencing the wisdom and guidance of a talented individual. This combination is particularly important in marketing where the effective blend of the science and the art of knowledge and judgment is so essential.”

Potential mentees can apply to the program online until July 30. This year’s successful applicants will take part in a new and dedicated educational program developed by York University’s Schulich Executive Education Centre

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