Basic Funerals takes lighter approach with TV spot

There’s nothing funny about funerals. But that doesn’t mean that TV commercials about arranging them can’t have some levity. A new 30-second spot for Basic Funerals and Cremation Choices, a Canadian funeral home, showcases a unique service the company offers that allows people to plan a funeral online. (The company claims it is Canada’s first […]

There’s nothing funny about funerals. But that doesn’t mean that TV commercials about arranging them can’t have some levity.

A new 30-second spot for Basic Funerals and Cremation Choices, a Canadian funeral home, showcases a unique service the company offers that allows people to plan a funeral online. (The company claims it is Canada’s first internet funeral service company.)

The woman, defending online funeral planning, says online arrangements can often cost half of its traditional counterpart. That was an important point to make, said Eric Vandermeersch, chief executive officer of Basic Funerals and Cremation Choices.

“When you talk about funerals, obviously it’s a sad time, but there’s also a great element of celebration. We’re not trying to make light of the serious side, what we’re really doing is showing people that we’ve changed the model—it doesn’t have to be expensive anymore,” he said. “There is a lighter side of the industry and we’re not afraid to show it because it is the most important side of the typical funeral.”

He added that commercials he’s seen for other funeral homes lack in the entertainment department. “Usually, it’s the owner of the funeral home standing by a fireplace talking about how his family has been in the industry for six generations and it’s pretty boring to say the least.”

His company’s spot was produced in collaboration with its agency of record, Toronto-based RedFish Entertainment, who also handled the media buy for the spot.

The initial campaign, said Vandermeersch, is scheduled for three weeks, but will continue beyond that.

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