Budweiser Canada’s blimp found after blowing away

The giant flying Red Light has gone AWOL

UPDATE (2:53 p.m.): They found it!

Budweiser Canada‘s massive Red Light blimp went missing for three days, but has been recovered.

Called Red Zeppelin, the 21-by-7-metre blimp was flying over New Brunswick as part of the brand’s ongoing hockey marketing campaign when it broke from its tether on April 26, according to Transport Canada.

The blimp was flying at 4,000 feet and moving north east at about 11 kilometres per hour. It’s expected to have landed somewhere near Sussex, New Brunswick.

Wade Keller, director, Labatt Breweries of Canada, explained to Marketing that a gust of wind that caused the Zeppelin to break from its tether as it was being lowered to the ground on Saturday.

CBC.ca is reporting that the blimp is now on private property (the location has not been disclosed) and Keller is in the process of arranging its retrieval.

The “red light” has been the focus of much of the brand’s marketing efforts in Canada since last winter, when its creative agency-of-record, Anomaly, created a light for consumers’ homes that goes off when their favourite team scores.

The blimp is a new incarnation of the red light and was flown over Canadian cities during Olympics and NHL hockey games all through the winter.

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