Cadbury builds bikes for Africa

Cadbury is converting sales into bicycle parts to help build 5,000 bikes for kids in Africa this year. Canadians can participate in the Bicycle Factory program by logging onto TheBicycleFactory.ca and entering the UPC code from participating Cadbury products including Caramilk, Dairy Milk, Trident, Dentyne, Stride, Wine Gums, Sour Patch Kids, Cherry Blasters, and all […]

Cadbury is converting sales into bicycle parts to help build 5,000 bikes for kids in Africa this year.

Canadians can participate in the Bicycle Factory program by logging onto TheBicycleFactory.ca and entering the UPC code from participating Cadbury products including Caramilk, Dairy Milk, Trident, Dentyne, Stride, Wine Gums, Sour Patch Kids, Cherry Blasters, and all Halls products. One UPC code entered equals one bicycle part, and 100 parts builds one bicycle.

“A bicycle is something so common in Canada, we use it for recreation or athletics, but in Africa they use it for mobility,” said Michelle Lefler, manager, corporate communication, Cadbury Canada.

“We’re hoping with Canadians’ help we can reach 5,000,” she said. “[That] is an enormous number for delivery to Africa… for every bike it helps not just the one person, but their family, friends, and people in need.”

Through the promotion one Canadian will be randomly selected to travel with the Cadbury team to Ghana to deliver the bicycles next October. Cadbury is also giving away over 1,000 instant prizes.

The site also houses a tool that allows participants to build a bike as a team, which helps generate interest through word-of-mouth, said Lefler.

“We really encourage Canadians to build bikes together; it’s meant to be collaborative… there is a great opportunity for people to start talking about the program.”

Toronto agency The Hive Strategic Marketing Inc. developed the Bicycle Factory program in collaboration with Cadbury, and created television spots, print and in-store materials that drive consumers to the site.

In addition, over 9,000 call-to-action tags will be placed on bikes in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal over the next two months. Cossette handled the media buy, while Strategic Objectives managed the PR push.

The promotion is part of the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership—a 10-year, $80-million initiative designed to help cocoa farming communities across the developing world.

Last month, Cadbury announced plans to sell Britain’s biggest-selling chocolate brand, Dairy Milk, under the Fairtrade logo in Britain and Ireland, by the end of the summer. The company is in discussions to pursue certification across other brands and markets, including Canada.

“We have been rooted in the African community for over 100 years and today we are as committed as ever to give access to everyday social and economic services we take for granted,” said Luisa Girotto, vice-president corporate affairs, Cadbury North America, in a release.

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