Canadian Olympic Committee files trademark lawsuit against North Face

The Canadian Olympic Committee has launched a lawsuit targeting the North Face clothing brand over allegations one of the company’s apparel lines violates Olympic trademarks. The B.C. Supreme Court lawsuit alleges a North Face clothing line named the Villagewear Collection and associated marketing were designed to give consumers the false impression that North Face was […]

The Canadian Olympic Committee has launched a lawsuit targeting the North Face clothing brand over allegations one of the company’s apparel lines violates Olympic trademarks.

The B.C. Supreme Court lawsuit alleges a North Face clothing line named the Villagewear Collection and associated marketing were designed to give consumers the false impression that North Face was an Olympic sponsor.

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A statement of claim says items were marketed with the words Sochi and Olympics and some included the label RU/14, which the lawsuit says was an obvious reference to the 2014 Olympics in Russia.

The Canadian Olympic Committee says in the court document that it warned North Face repeatedly to stop, and while the company rebranded the line the International Collection, it otherwise did not comply with the committee’s demands.

The lawsuit is seeking a permanent injunction to stop the North Face’s marketing practices, as well as damages.

North Face couldn’t immediately be reached for comment, but the company has previously said it has never claimed to be an Olympic sponsor.

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