Click This: University of Alberta’s anti-homophobia site

It’s surprising how effective even a small amount of data can be when you’re trying to change the world. Edmonton agency Calder Bateman and Vancouver’s Burnkit teamed up to create NoHomophobes.com, a web project tracking homophobic language use in social media in real time. Developed pro bono for the University of Alberta‘s Institute for Sexual […]

It’s surprising how effective even a small amount of data can be when you’re trying to change the world.

Edmonton agency Calder Bateman and Vancouver’s Burnkit teamed up to create NoHomophobes.com, a web project tracking homophobic language use in social media in real time.

Developed pro bono for the University of Alberta‘s Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services, the site charts four unfortunately common anti-gay slurs by day, week and “all time” across Twitter. The site design also names and shames the offenders, displaying their Twitter handle and profile picture along with the offensive tweet itself.

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