Taste the Feeling 2

Coca-Cola gives Canada a taste of its new global campaign

Creative set to launch next month

Taste the Feeling 3Coca-Cola has launched a global “Taste the Feeling” initiative including some Canadian-specific elements, in what one executive is calling the company’s “biggest campaign in decades.”

The latest marketing push, which will be seen across most forms of traditional and digital media, is part of the iconic beverage brand’s “One Brand” strategy, which sees Coca-Cola share the spotlight with its Diet Coca-Cola and Coca-Cola Zero sister products. Coca-Cola says it’s the first time the company has marketed its most well-known drinks under a single theme.

The purpose is to highlight the different drink choices consumers can make, at a time when many are watching how much sugar and calories they consume.

“If you look at where trends are going, everything is about customization and wanting it your way,” Michael Samoszewski, the Toronto-based vice-president of Coca-Cola’s Sparkling Business Unit, told Marketing.

“It’s the right time to do it, given where the consumer is going in terms of looking for options for their lifestyle.”

The campaign will roll out at various times across all markets globally in 2016. Canada will be among the first countries in the world to see the campaign, starting in February, the company said.

The entire project includes 10 television commercials, more than 100 images, new music and anthem and shareable and customizable interactive digital elements.

“This is going to be our biggest campaign in decades,” said Samoszewski. “Every medium you can think of, we’ll be activating.”

Coke one brandCanada won’t see all of the creative, but unlike some countries it will see tags at the end of spots promoting smaller pack size for consumers, such as the 100-calorie glass bottle or 90-calorie mini can.

The campaign also has French-language content for the Quebec market.

Coca-Cola Canada will also include partners such as the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens in the campaign, as well as promotion across social media from well-known Canadians celebrities.

The overall creative was done by 10 different agencies around the world. For example, the TV commercials were produced by the following four agencies: Mercado-McCann, Sra. Rushmore, Santo, and Oglivy & Mather New York.

Canadian agencies involved include Publicis, on the creative end, UM for media buying, Mosaic for experiential marketing, Gravity for digital and social media and Hill + Knowlton Strategies handling public relations.

Coca-Cola wouldn’t provide information on sales in the Canadian market, but said per capita consumption in the country is on par with Germany, the United Kingdom and Sweden.

See all comments Recent Comments
Lex Dunn

So much money to sell high fructose corn syrup and water. Poisoning the world doesn’t come cheap.

Tuesday, January 26 @ 1:14 pm |

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