Coca-Cola N.America searches for social media monitoring agency

Coca-Cola North America has launched an agency search to help it better monitor its brand online through the nebulous and often treacherous channels of social media. The winning agency will be responsible for formulating a consistent way of keeping track of what consumers are saying across Twitter, Facebook and other channels about all of Coca-Cola’s […]

Coca-Cola North America has launched an agency search to help it better monitor its brand online through the nebulous and often treacherous channels of social media.

The winning agency will be responsible for formulating a consistent way of keeping track of what consumers are saying across Twitter, Facebook and other channels about all of Coca-Cola’s brands in North America. It will then report back to the company to yield insights into how to improve or tweak marketing, and determine consumer sentiment about specific products.

The pitch – which internally Coca-Cola is calling a “listening review” – encompasses social-media monitoring across billion-dollar brands such as Coke, Diet Coke, Coke Zero, Sprite, Minute Maid, Powerade, Vitaminwater and Dasani.

Kerry Tressler, a Coca-Cola spokeswoman, said some 20 agencies have been involved in the selection process. She noted the company is looking to select a single agency and expects the decision will be made “fairly quickly.” She also said that roster shop 360i is among the agencies participating in the process.

New York-based 360i is the digital agency of record for a number of Coca-Cola brands, as well as the company’s Freestyle vending machine. Executives familiar with the review said that the agencies are from a variety of disciplines. In a few instances, holding companies are making teams of shops with digital capabilities, such as PR, social media and media planning/buying.

“[Our goal is] to identify a consistent agency and format for conducting social-media monitoring,” Tressler said. “[We want] to yield the most information about what consumers are saying about our brands, so we know what they are looking for.”

Some executives familiar with the new objective said it could resemble Gatorade’s “Mission Control.” When it launched last year, Gatorade devoted an actual space, complete with monitoring screens and tools, to its social-media engagement and feedback cause. That space also served as the subject of a mainstream marketing story.

However, Tressler said she wouldn’t compare Coca-Cola’s effort to what Gatorade has done with Mission Control. Coca-Cola’s effort, she said, is purely about mining information and won’t entail a physical space.

To read the original article in Advertising Age, click here.

Brands Articles

CMOs want the “brand” back in branded content

At IAB Engage, marketers for Molson, Kraft, Cara Foods talk branded content strategy

Airbnb signs deal to sponsor 2016 Rio Olympic Games

Online community is the Games' first alternative accommodations sponsor

Grey Canada gets a shot at Tequila Herradura

Brown-Forman brand awards digital CRM and below-the-line duties to WPP shop

Metro pairs fashion with food

Grocer partners with fashion magazine Flare on food-focused marketing campaign

Activia kicks off campaign with world record attempt

Yogurt brand positions itself as a "lifestyle partner" through Rogers Media partnership

HBO Canada gives fans a chance to sit on the Iron Throne

Selection of Game of Thrones products available at Toronto pop-up shop

Frank & Oak push pop-up competition in the U.S.

Montreal-based retailer is giving consumers the power to pick temporary locations

How to create an engaging flyer

Expert Patrick Rodmell shares five best practices that apply to all retail sectors

What the Heinz-Kraft merger could mean for Canada

Experts say deal will likely lead to layoffs as the two companies find ways to share costs