Do you cut the mustard for Grey Poupon’s Facebook campaign?

Every brand wants lots of Facebook fans, don’t they? Not Grey Poupon, a mustard brand that carries itself with an exclusive, haughty air. Through agency Crispin Porter + Bogusky, the Kraft-owned condiment is launching a Facebook campaign in which only fans who are identified as having “good taste” can “like” it on the social network. […]

Every brand wants lots of Facebook fans, don’t they? Not Grey Poupon, a mustard brand that carries itself with an exclusive, haughty air.

Through agency Crispin Porter + Bogusky, the Kraft-owned condiment is launching a Facebook campaign in which only fans who are identified as having “good taste” can “like” it on the social network.

Fans of the brand are asked to apply for membership to the “Society of Good Taste” on the Grey Poupon Facebook page, where an algorithm will determine whether or not they “cut the mustard.”

The algorithm searches and judges users’ profiles based on their proper use of grammar, art taste, check ins, book and movie selections, and so forth, and gives them a percentile score based on their refinement. However, if the algorithm detects poor taste in music or text-speak, for example, they could be rejected. Those who do not qualify will have their “like” deleted, and be asked to refine their profile before trying again.

The idea is a fresh take on Grey Poupon’s “refined” positioning of the past, like the memorable “Pardon Me” spot from 1988 featuring two wealthy gents exchanging the spread while in passing cars.

Grey Poupon has also launched a new website entirely on Pinterest, with boards including recipes and tips on refined living.

To read the original article on Advertising Age, click here.

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