DreamWorks ‘Speed’ing tickets hit windshields nationwide

Thousands of unsuspecting drivers across the country found “infraction notices” on their windshields last weekend. But the familiar slips held a surprising message. “Mad? Don’t be,” they said. “This could be your ticket to win!” The text and the backside revealed the ruse: the tickets were actually a Need for Speed ad and contest – […]

Thousands of unsuspecting drivers across the country found “infraction notices” on their windshields last weekend.

But the familiar slips held a surprising message. “Mad? Don’t be,” they said. “This could be your ticket to win!” The text and the backside revealed the ruse: the tickets were actually a Need for Speed ad and contest – part of an experiential marketing promotion for the DreamWorks Pictures movie, which hits theatres this Friday.

Created by Simon Pure Marketing, the fake tickets were placed on cars parked around theatres, sporting events and nightlife areas in cities across Canada, including Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and Calgary.

“The nature of this film lends itself quite well to an activation involving cars,” said Greg Mason, vice-president of marketing at Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures Canada (which distributes the film). “We also wanted to incorporate a social media element, and we liked the idea of having a bit of fun by having people think they’ve received a parking ticket that is actually a potential ticket to win.”

By taking a photo of the ticket and sharing it with the hashtag #NFSTICKET, people could enter the contest and get the chance to win 50 prizes, including autographed movie posters, film screenings and other paraphernalia. Hundreds of people took photos of their tickets, some of which can be seen at nfsticket.com.

The tickets were modified to match each city’s official parking tickets, including Toronto’s yellow heart-stoppers.

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