Oreo gets multicultural in rare new Canadian ad

Kraft Canada wants to show that the love of Oreo cookies knows no boundaries in a new 30-second television commercial that marks the brand's first Canadian-specific ad since 2005.

Kraft Canada wants to show that the love of Oreo cookies knows no boundaries in a new 30-second television commercial that marks the brand’s first Canadian-specific ad since 2005.

“Moving Day” opens with a little boy arriving at a new neighbour’s house with two glasses of milk and a bag full of Oreo cookies. He finds a boy his age who only speaks Mandarin but the two are able to communicate through the way they eat their Oreo cookies.

The commercial ends with the tag line: “Only Oreo.”

The ad can be viewed on Facebook.

“What we were trying to do with this spot was make Oreo relevant for Canada and make sure we reflect our cultural fabric and diversity, which is what Canada is today and how it’s growing,” said Emmanuelle Voirin, senior brand manager, Oreo.

Exploring the new Canadian experience makes the ad relevant and contemporary, she said.

Though the overall concept was developed by the brand’s creative agency Draft FCB Canada, Kraft also worked with multicultural marketing agency Kang & Lee Advertising.

Kang & Lee “helped us understand how to make sure we could reflect the reality of what a new Canadian family moving in would be bringing with them and how they would be dressed,” Voirin said.

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