Google named Canada’s most influential brand

Tim Hortons surges into top ten Google has dethroned Microsoft as Canada’s “most influential brand.” The California-based company knocked Microsoft out of the top spot and into the No. 2 position, according to an Ipsos Reid online survey of 5,000 Canadians. Results of the second annual study were unveiled this morning at a presentation during […]

Tim Hortons surges into top ten

Google has dethroned Microsoft as Canada’s “most influential brand.”

The California-based company knocked Microsoft out of the top spot and into the No. 2 position, according to an Ipsos Reid online survey of 5,000 Canadians.

Results of the second annual study were unveiled this morning at a presentation during FFWD Advertising and Marketing Week.

The findings suggest that Google was more relevant in people’s lives in 2012, compared to the year before. Canadians indicated that Google is important in today’s world and encourages them to make better and smarter choices.

To be deemed influential by the study, a brand must stay focused on the consumer experience and innovate and adapt to the changing market, Steve Levy, president of Toronto-based Ipsos Reid, told Marketing.

As part of the study, Ipsos Reid identified five key dimensions that contribute to brand influence: trustworthy, engaging, leading edge, presence and corporate citizenship. Survey respondents were given a series of yes or no statements within each category for each brand.

Google excelled in each of these areas, said Levy. In the survey, 59% of respondents said Google has a strong future, 52% said they use Google today and 52% considers it a reliable resource.

“Whether it’s search, to maps, to Chrome, Android, Google Drive – everything we do is about making their lives a little bit easier,” says Chris O’Neill, managing director of Google Canada

“We really try to make them so easy to use that you want to use them at home or at work and everywhere in between,” he says. “The other part that goes hand in hand with that is earning the trust and sustaining the trust of our users.”

In comparison, 45% of respondents say Microsoft has a strong future and 50% said they use it. The brand is seen as innovative (40%) and has forever changed the consumer landscape (39%).

Apple rounded out the top three brands, moving up one spot from last year. New to the top 10 was Tim Hortons, which moved up seven spots to No. 8.

The complete list of the top 10 most influential brands in Canada:

• Google
• Microsoft
• Apple
• Facebook
• Walmart
• Visa
• YouTube
• Tim Hortons
• Air Miles
• CBC

For the first time, Ipsos Reid examined brand influence on a global scale. Consumers were surveyed in eight other markets, including the U.S., Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, U.K., France, Germany and China. (These countries count for 54% of global GDP.)

The top three most influential brands in Canada also topped the global list:

• Google
• Microsoft
• Apple
• Facebook
• Visa
• Coca-Cola
• Samsung
• YouTube
• MasterCard
• Procter & Gamble

For more on Ipsos Reid’s survey, including comment from Canada’s most influential marketers, see the soon-to-be-release Feb. 18 issue of Marketing.

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