Homegrown brand Rudsak to launch outerwear line for kids

After years of crafting apparel and accessories for adults, Rudsak is targeting the younger crowd with the launch of its latest line. The homegrown leather goods brand is creating smaller-sized versions of its Canadian outerwear collection specifically for children. The children’s collection will launch three styles: two named Lola and Lili designed for girls, with a […]

After years of crafting apparel and accessories for adults, Rudsak is targeting the younger crowd with the launch of its latest line.

The homegrown leather goods brand is creating smaller-sized versions of its Canadian outerwear collection specifically for children.

The children’s collection will launch three styles: two named Lola and Lili designed for girls, with a third, Lulu, which will be unisex.

Rudsak founder and creative leader Evik Asatoorian said the kids’ line was the “next obvious step” for the brand, which launched in 1994, and he pointed to his own two boys as inspiration.

“I wanted to create Canadian-designed clothes for kids that keep them warm and comfortable at the same time, but also stylish and on trend with the current season,” Asatoorian said in a release.

The Rudsak Kids collection is set to be made available in stores and online by the end of September.

The brand also plans to open three new locations in Quebec during the remainder of the year, with additional store openings forecasted for Toronto next year.

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