Intel puts logo inside Barcelona jerseys, may hardly ever be seen

Barcelona, the popular Spanish football team, has signed a sponsorship deal with American semiconductor chip maker Intel, whose logo may never be seen despite being on the team’s jerseys. Barcelona says the four-year deal – worth a reported 25 million euros (US$34 million) – will see ‘Intel Inside’ placed on the inside front of the […]

Barcelona, the popular Spanish football team, has signed a sponsorship deal with American semiconductor chip maker Intel, whose logo may never be seen despite being on the team’s jerseys.

Barcelona says the four-year deal – worth a reported 25 million euros (US$34 million) – will see ‘Intel Inside’ placed on the inside front of the team’s jersey, which means it may be seen only when a player lifts his shirt over his head in celebration.

The Catalan club calls the unorthodox deal “a pioneering initiative in the world of sports advertising.”

Barcelona says the deal will see Intel provide Barcelona players and coaches with company devices and look to improve research, training, and performance using the multinational company’s technology.

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