Kraft searches for Canada’s Ultimate Food Hacker

Contest winner will receive $25,000 and opportunity to create new recipes

Pass the grilled mac and cheese with bacon sandwich… Kraft Canada has launched a national talent search for Canada’s Ultimate Food Hacker.

“Food hacking” is a growing trend whereby home cooks give everyday foods unexpected twists. The meals are also meant to be easy and convenient to make.

The idea behind the Kraft Canada campaign is to “amplify food hacks in stores and online and to help consumers spend more time with their loved ones and less time in the kitchen,” according to the company.

“We’re looking for someone who is dedicated to food hacking, has a big personality, is open to trying new things and – most importantly – loves to cook,” said Andrea Nickel, senior brand manager of Kraft Canada, in a release.

The winning candidate will be Kraft Canada’s official food hacker and will develop new food hacking recipes and drive related content through Kraft Canada’s social channels. The opportunity comes with a one-year contract, including $25,000 in compensation and a monthly food allowance designed to inspire creative food hacking solutions.

The contest is open until Aug. 5. Participants are encouraged to upload a video submission. Kraft Canada will select the Food Hacker based on personality, originality and social media savviness. People can join the conversation on Twitter using @FoodHacks and #iamfoodhacks.

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