Kraft’s Bonin Bough on being mocked by Colbert

When Stephen Colbert mockingly read every word of Wheat Thins’ brand brief on air as part of the product’s show sponsorship, Kraft Foods‘ marketers were probably wondering what they’d gotten themselves into. Wheat Thins’ high-minded brand brief says the crackers are not “a creator of isolated, un-sharable experiences,” Colbert announced, to laughter from his audience. […]

When Stephen Colbert mockingly read every word of Wheat Thins’ brand brief on air as part of the product’s show sponsorship, Kraft Foods‘ marketers were probably wondering what they’d gotten themselves into.

Wheat Thins’ high-minded brand brief says the crackers are not “a creator of isolated, un-sharable experiences,” Colbert announced, to laughter from his audience. They are “a snack for anyone actively seeking experiences” and “a connector of like-minded people.”

But Bonin Bough, vice-president for global media and consumer engagement at Kraft Foods, said Wednesday that the integration achieved exactly what Kraft needed.

“For seven minutes he read the entire brand brief on TV,” Bough said, speaking at Ad Age‘s Social Engagement/Social TV Conference. “Now, some people were a little nervous. He talked about it being a ‘warrior brand.'”

But it all drove an incredible amount of social response and engagement, Bough said. “You could not ask for something better even if you wrote it yourself.”

To read the original story in Advertising Age, click here.

Is Bough right, or is he putting a good light on a bad situation? Post your thoughts in our comment section.

Brands Articles

The bear necessities of Freedom’s rebranding

With a new name and mascot, a challenger telco takes a softer approach

Air Miles backtracks on points cancellation plan

LoyaltyOne says legislative 'uncertainty' drove decision

Ethnic retailing is moving from niche to mainstream

Canadian consumers are changing, but too few retailers are paying attention

Telling Canadian writers’ stories

The Juggernaut's series for the Writers Guild of Canada makes the case for our culture

Increased demand drives Grocery Gateway’s growth

Longo's CEO says online grocery shopping has 'come of age'

Canadian Olympic Committee signs with Sid Lee

COC signs with new agency of record until 2020 Tokyo Games

Luxury retail must go digital or be forgotten (column)

AJ Dalal says luxury retail ignores the connected shopper at its peril

Carlsberg picks Ogilvy as AOR

The agency wins all of the brewer's brands in Canada, including Kronenbourg and Somersby.

Localize labels talk to consumers about food sourcing

QR codes and a scoring system tell Ottawa shoppers where they're buying from