Look at this: Dianes Lingerie’s transparent event

Seven fashion models ranging in age from 20 to 50 walked downtown Vancouver last week clad in black underwear and see-through designer clothing. Billed as a “live fashion event,” the stunt was meant to drive awareness and increase traffic for Dianes Lingerie, a Vancouver retail store. “The idea is that when you wear a Diane’s […]

Seven fashion models ranging in age from 20 to 50 walked downtown Vancouver last week clad in black underwear and see-through designer clothing.

Billed as a “live fashion event,” the stunt was meant to drive awareness and increase traffic for Dianes Lingerie, a Vancouver retail store.

“The idea is that when you wear a Diane’s bra you feel so confident that you might want to show off your bra,” said Mia Thomsett, copywriter at Dare, the store’s agency.

“They came to us looking to get their name out and get women thinking about getting properly fitted bras… Our brief was to make a splash around the city.”

Diane Thomson, the store’s owner and founder (pictured in purple above), has been in business for 28 years, and said while she has fit three generations of women in her store (and continues to do so), her target customer is 26- to 55-years old.

The tag-line for the campaign, which will include transit advertising in the fall, is “Bras you want to show off.”

Local fashion designer Jason Matlo (pictured above in denim) created seven different outfits for the event, which will take place again Oct. 1.

“It was important to show women who weren’t skinny 15-year-old models,” said Thomsett. “We made sure that we had real women of varying ages and sizes going about their day – taking the bus, getting lunch at the food court or going to Starbucks with their friends.”

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