Marketing Bits: TED likes our ponies, North Americans like 3D films

• Ari Elkouby, associate creative director at Proximity Canada, got into Applied Arts and did something different with his mugshot. • You may remember Starbucks announced it had refined its logo. Yesterday, the company’s 40th anniversary, marked its widespread deployment. • TED has this little knockoff of our Ads You Must See called Ads Worth […]

• Ari Elkouby, associate creative director at Proximity Canada, got into Applied Arts and did something different with his mugshot.

• You may remember Starbucks announced it had refined its logo. Yesterday, the company’s 40th anniversary, marked its widespread deployment.

TED has this little knockoff of our Ads You Must See called Ads Worth Spreading. You may have heard of it. In any case, two Canadian projects made the list: John St.’s Pretty Ponies, and Dentsu Canada’s Legendary Biru. Congrats guys.

• North American revenues from 3D movies were approximately $2.2 billion last year. That’s nearly double the 2009 figures.

• Lifting the veil on some of Facebook’s arcana, GigaOm has this piece explaining its “likes.”

• I’m no mathematician, but this web comic from geek-favoured XKCD explains what I’ve always suspected.

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