Microsoft creates zombie apocalypse to promote new Xbox

Events running Canada-wide prime gamer market for new console

A zombie apocalypse descended on Vancouver Thursday night just in time for Halloween.

The stunt, part of Microsoft Canada‘s campaign for its new Xbox One system, saw 100 actors dressed as zombies burst out of a 12-metre-long replica of the gaming console.

The zombies then “battled” consumers who were given mock chainsaws and hammers, coming together as a real life recreation of the upcoming Xbox game Dead Rising 3.

Once all the zombies were defeated, consumers were invited into the giant Xbox to test the new system, take photos and have their faces painted with professional special effects zombie makeup.

The company revealed no information about what would happen when Vancouver’s “colossal” Xbox appeared ominously at sunrise Wednesday at the high-traffic corner of Nelson St. and Seymour St. To begin the activation, a predetermined number of Xbox gamers had to  “pledge” their gamertags – a social action similar to “liking” on Facebook.

The activation was one of a series Microsoft Canada has planned in major Canadian cities in the coming weeks leading up the console’s launch on Nov. 22.

Microsoft Canada Xbox brand manager Nicole Fawcette explained the brand decided to launch the campaign around Halloween in Vancouver, as the Vancouver office of Capcom developed Dead Rising 3 as an Xbox exclusive.

The stunt was a collaboration between Microsoft Canada and its agencies, including Mosaic, TraffikGroup, Wunderman and Digital Production Services. PR was handled by Veritas and the media buy was handled by Starcom Media Vest Group.

A full media campaign will also support the launch, including billboards near the locations of the activations across the country, digital display ads and a U.S. created TV spot by CP+B that is currently in market in Canada.

The Canadian campaign also includes a contest element in each city, starting with awarding one consumer a trip to Toronto for the Xbox One launch party, expected just before the console’s release to stores.

Brands Articles

Air Miles backtracks on points cancellation plan

LoyaltyOne says legislative 'uncertainty' drove decision

Ethnic retailing is moving from niche to mainstream

Canadian consumers are changing, but too few retailers are paying attention

Telling Canadian writers’ stories

The Juggernaut's series for the Writers Guild of Canada makes the case for our culture

Increased demand drives Grocery Gateway’s growth

Longo's CEO says online grocery shopping has 'come of age'

Canadian Olympic Committee signs with Sid Lee

COC signs with new agency of record until 2020 Tokyo Games

Luxury retail must go digital or be forgotten (column)

AJ Dalal says luxury retail ignores the connected shopper at its peril

Carlsberg picks Ogilvy as AOR

The agency wins all of the brewer's brands in Canada, including Kronenbourg and Somersby.

Localize labels talk to consumers about food sourcing

QR codes and a scoring system tell Ottawa shoppers where they're buying from

YWCA’s Blame pop-up takes on victim blaming culture

A faux brand from Juniper Park\TBWA steps away from #NotOkay