Missing Children postage stamps return

An innovative project is again putting missing children’s photos on Canadian postage stamps. The initiative, now in its second year, was created by Toronto ad agency Lowe Roche for The Missing Children’s Network, a Quebec organization that helps parents search for missing children and creates prevention programs. This year’s campaign kicked off with an April […]

An innovative project is again putting missing children’s photos on Canadian postage stamps.

The initiative, now in its second year, was created by Toronto ad agency Lowe Roche for The Missing Children’s Network, a Quebec organization that helps parents search for missing children and creates prevention programs.

This year’s campaign kicked off with an April 6 event at Toronto’s Beverley Hotel. There, a billboard of Cédrika Provencher (who went missing in Trois-Rivières, Que., when she was nine) was covered in more than 1,000 stamps bearing the faces of four missing children. As people removed the stamps, the portrait slowly became visible – symbolizing the larger impact of the effort.

“We’re hoping to help keep the plight of missing and exploited children top-of-mind for Canadians,” says Jane Murray, co-creative director at Lowe Roche, adding she hopes it “inspires them to learn more about the issue, and maybe even trigger the recognition that leads to a homecoming.”

People can order stamps through MissingKidsStamps.ca, a bilingual site where users can pick a missing child’s photo. The picture is then routed through Canada Post’s personalized stamps option.

The project is being promoted with earned media through Glossy PR and social media. And the site recently became a People’s Voice finalist for the Webby Awards.

“The postage stamp is so universal, and passes through so many hands each day – it offers a way of paying homage to these children so they will never be forgotten. We were surprised no one had thought to use them in this way before, but more than happy to be the first to innovate in this way,” said Pina Arcamone, director general of The Missing Children’s Network.

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