Mitsubishi chases down new branding campaign

A man is driving through dark city streets, turning around tight corners and dodging other cars before pulling a u-turn, backing into an alley and turning off the car. There’s a twist at the end of Mitsubishi’s latest TV spot, of course, but the Mitsubishi Lancer gets some sexy nighttime chase scenes before the screen […]

A man is driving through dark city streets, turning around tight corners and dodging other cars before pulling a u-turn, backing into an alley and turning off the car. There’s a twist at the end of Mitsubishi’s latest TV spot, of course, but the Mitsubishi Lancer gets some sexy nighttime chase scenes before the screen darkens and a slogan appears: “Must be the Mitsubishi.”

The automaker’s new slogan centres on the idea that a Mitsubishi can change you. The spot – and its French-language counterpart – are meant to build the company’s overall auto brand, not the Lancer in particular.

In the past, the company tended to do a lot of “one-offs,” said Peter Renz, director of national marketing for Mitsubishi Motor Sales of Canada. “Consistency is what we need now.”

Stephen Jurisic, co-creative director and partner at John St., the agency behind Mitsubishi’s new campaign, describes its direction as “bold, spirited, and youthful… We need to get people thinking about [Mitsubishi] as a brand image, not as a car,” said Jurisic, “because people fall for brands, not for the car.”

Along with their current television ad “Tail,” the new campaign consists of print ads and an online video, all pushed out through social media. (The automotive brand has only been in Canada for 10 years, but has had a strong online presence from the start; the Lancer Evolution Facebook page has over 868,000 “likes.”)

Brands Articles

SoFresh embraces its Canuck roots

A dairy alternative brand tries to make its U.S.-grown ingredients more Canadian

Plan Canada refreshes Gifts of Hope

Annual giving campaign positioned as perfect gift for the hard-to-shop-for

Amazon unveils a store with no checkout

Sensors register shoppers' items and automatically charge them to Amazon app

Wake-Ups return after 65-year advertising slumber

A caffeine pill with broad consumer market ambitions

Pickle Barrel shows local food some love

Why the Ontario casual dining brand upped its focus on fresh ingredients

Tourisme Montreal apologizes in advance

The city's 375th birthday celebrations will likely wake the neighbours all year

Baton Rouge introduces revamped restaurant format

Ontario location the first to get new look of 18 planned through 2018

The bear necessities of Freedom’s rebranding

With a new name and mascot, a challenger telco takes a softer approach

Air Miles backtracks on points cancellation plan

LoyaltyOne says legislative 'uncertainty' drove decision