Mobilicity says Telus to acquire company for $350 million in proposed sale

Mobilicity says it has agreed to be purchased by Telus Corp. for $350 million. Mobilicity says the proposed sale is subject to approval by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the Competition Bureau, Industry Canada, and Mobilicity’s debtholders. Telus has twice tried to buy struggling Mobilicity, but both times the deal was rejected by Industry […]

Mobilicity says it has agreed to be purchased by Telus Corp. for $350 million.

Mobilicity says the proposed sale is subject to approval by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the Competition Bureau, Industry Canada, and Mobilicity’s debtholders.

Telus has twice tried to buy struggling Mobilicity, but both times the deal was rejected by Industry Canada.

“We will not approve spectrum-transfer requests that decrease competition in our wireless sector,” Jake Enwright, a spokesman for Industry Minister James Moore, said Friday.

This time, however, Mobilicity says it believes the deal will satisfy the federal agency’s criteria and will not affect competition in the Canadian wireless sector.

The company also says the “vast majority” of its 165,000 active subscribers would be able to seamlessly migrate onto Telus’ network after the transition.

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Mobilicity also says it there are “no foreseen changes to employee staffing levels” under the proposed transaction.

“The transaction is a good outcome from Mobilicity’s restructuring efforts and extensive sales process,” said William Aziz, Mobilicity’s chief restructuring officer.

“I am confident the transaction will serve the best interests of Mobilicity’s customers and employees.”

Mobilicity has been operating under creditor protection since September 2013.

The company has been seeking a buy and had contacted 25 organizations about submitting bids. Five bids were received by the Dec. 16, 2013 extended deadline and only the Telus bid was deemed acceptable.

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