Coors Light

New Coors Light ad starts on the mountain, but goes adventuring with millennials

Leo Burnett wants younger beer drinkers back with Coors Light

Coors Light has a new spokesman for a new strategic direction: a mountain man wearing a talking bearskin, who believes saying yes to adventure (and drinking Coors Light, presumably) always leads to better stories than saying no.

In a new ad for the Molson Coors-owned brand, created by Leo Burnett, the bearded spokesman starts on a mountain top – to keep the work “rooted in the brand’s DNA,” according to group creative director Steve Persico) – but takes viewers through different scenarios that may occur during or after a night out. It could include “going to bed not in your bed,” “pantlessness” and “winning donkeys named Richard” (or Pedro in the French version) Revelers are urged to “say yes to adventure.”

According to Persico and his partner and co-CD Anthony Chelvanathan, the ad represents a change in the communications focus for the brand.

“Coors wanted us to bring back the wit and humour that the brand once had before it became obsessed with the cold,” Chelvanathan said. “So we started playing with the idea of carpe diem, and the idea of adventure. We wanted it to be funny but not too juvenile.”

Leo Burnett wins Coors Light account in Canada

The brand is hoping to entice millennials and the lower Gen Y age group back to the product because “there are more beers out there than ever before. People have been trending towards wine and micro brews,” Chelvanathan said.

The current 60-second spot will live online, while 30-second commercials will run on TV till until the end of summer. Mountain man will also make an appearance on social media and other touch points over the coming season too, the agency said.

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