Nova Scotia lights up new anti-smoking campaign

      The Nova Scotia government’s Department of Health and Wellness has launched an advertising campaign that highlights the dwindling number of young people who smoke cigarettes. The campaign includes television and cinema ads, as well as a website and street-level executions developed by Halifax agency Extreme Group. The television and cinema spots both […]
 


   

The Nova Scotia government’s Department of Health and Wellness has launched an advertising campaign that highlights the dwindling number of young people who smoke cigarettes.

The campaign includes television and cinema ads, as well as a website and street-level executions developed by Halifax agency Extreme Group.

The television and cinema spots both depict young adolescents whose attempts at goofing off are disrupted by the lack of a lighter. In one ad, a boy positions himself to ignite his own flatulence but is unable to procure a lighter from any of his friends. In the other spot, a teenager prepares to light a rocket in his backyard, only to find that no one has a lighter handy.

Both spots conclude with the superimposed copy, “Hardly anyone smokes anymore,” followed by a throw to the 15andfalling.ca website. The url refers to results from the 2009 Canadian Tobacco Usage Monitoring Survey, which indicated that only 15% of Canadian teens smoke.

 


   

“We discovered that most teens think a lot more people smoke than actually do, and because of that they think it’s acceptable,” said Shawn King, vice-president and chief creative officer at Extreme Group. “When we found out that 85% of teens don’t smoke—which means only 15% of them do—and fed that back to the target, they were shocked.”

Steve Machat, manager of tobacco control, Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness, expects the campaign’s humour and focus on social norms to make an impact with teens.

“It’s unconventional, compared to campaigns that we’ve seen in other jurisdictions where they emphasize themes that really have nothing to do with the target population, like the dark, unhealthy lung or all those fear tactics,” said Machat.

Extreme Group also developed 9-ft. dinosaurs out of ashtrays, museum-style artifact boxes containing smoking paraphernalia, and spray-painted silhouettes of smokers that disappear over time. This collateral—all of which, King said, was designed to depict smoking as an antiquated habit—has been placed near schools, in malls and in other high-traffic areas in the province.

The campaign launched earlier this week.

Brands Articles

Sorry Canada, McDonald’s all-day breakfast is not for you

New from the fast food chain quickly becomes an election issue on Twitter

Sears Canada narrows operating loss

Struggling retailer says it had a "turning point" in the month of June

McDonald’s to offer all-day breakfast in the U.S. next month

Fast food chain tweaking menu in a bid to boost dwindling sales

Reitmans’ plans for reinvention

New marketing and fashion focus aims to freshen up women's clothing brand

Sobeys Quebec offers certified humane chicken products

Products part of Sobeys new Compliments Naturally Simple private label

Torrid set to heat up Canada’s plus-size market

Yes, plus-size clothing can be this sexy

Mondelez picks four Canadian startups for shopper program

Beacon technology a big theme of redefining grocery shopping

The future looks good for Canadian retailers (Survey)

Strong sales attributed to better service

Watch This: John Lewis dances into our hearts

British retailer's charming new ad gets a musical assist from Elton John