Pro-Muslim ads going up next to anti-jihad posters in NYC

Two religious groups will hang ads urging tolerance alongside anti-jihad advertisements in New York City subways that equate Muslim radicals with savages. The ads by Rabbis for Human Rights – North America and the Christian group Sojourners will go up Monday. The New York Times reports that they’ll hang in the 10 Manhattan subway stations […]

Two religious groups will hang ads urging tolerance alongside anti-jihad advertisements in New York City subways that equate Muslim radicals with savages.

The ads by Rabbis for Human Rights – North America and the Christian group Sojourners will go up Monday.

The New York Times reports that they’ll hang in the 10 Manhattan subway stations where the anti-jihad ads implying enemies of Israel are “savages” appear.

The rabbis’ ad says: “In the choice between love and hate, choose love. Help stop bigotry against our Muslim neighbours.”

The Christian ad says: “Love your Muslim neighbours.”

On Wednesday, another group, United Methodist Women, placed pro-Muslim ads in the subway. They say: “Hate speech is not civilized.”

The American Freedom Defence Initiative is behind the anti-jihad ads.

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