Rob Ford faces No Ford Nation’s fake candidates in new campaign

As Toronto’s mayoral race starts to gain momentum, faux campaign signs are popping up in public spaces courtesy of community group No Ford Nation. One sign spotted in the city’s Trinity Bellwoods Park urges voters to elect fake candidate Jeff McElroy. His slogan? “He promises to just smoke pot as mayor. Not crack.” Another sign […]

As Toronto’s mayoral race starts to gain momentum, faux campaign signs are popping up in public spaces courtesy of community group No Ford Nation.

One sign spotted in the city’s Trinity Bellwoods Park urges voters to elect fake candidate Jeff McElroy. His slogan? “He promises to just smoke pot as mayor. Not crack.”

Another sign features “Ray Faranzi” promising that, unlike Toronto’s current mayor, Rob Ford, he won’t threaten to kill people and get publicly drunk. He’ll just get publicly drunk.

It’s part of an anyone-but-Ford campaign spearheaded by local writer Christina Robins. Robins started the volunteer-run, not-for-profit organization three years ago.

“If I can get people looking at other candidates and making a better choice, then I’ll have done my job,” said Robins.

And it is a full-time job, at least for now. Robins, who is taking a break from writing her latest novel to run this operation, oversees a team of volunteers who moderate the No Ford Nation Facebook page. “They’re people who are tired of the ridiculousness in our city and want to take it back,” said Robins of her staff.

Visitors to NoFordNation.com can read a summary of Ford’s “lies and misleading results” uncovered by the Toronto Star, and learn more about those running against him.

To spread No Ford Nation’s message, Robins collaborated with Toronto- and Vancouver-based ad agency Rethink to produce the fake campaign signs and a series of videos. The cartoon reenactments – done by Toronto production company Crush – of the mayor’s most notorious moments use real audio from Ford’s press conferences and… social engagements.

Caleb Goodman, partner and managing director at Rethink, said the videos were fairly easy to conceptualize. “The raw material was so rich creatively that the ads literally wrote themselves,” he said. Just as Saturday Night Live inserted Sarah Palin’s transcripts directly into their scripts, the team at Rethink agreed that they could never come up with any dialogue better than Ford’s real soundbites.

Brands Articles

Maple Leaf Foods launches ‘Songs in the Key of Wiener’

Facebook campaign for Larsen Wieners pays homage to the “As Seen On TV” era

Mattel and Walmart open virtual store in Pearson Airport

The brand and retailer are targeting busy travellers this holiday season

Nissan hopes to score with final leg of CFL program

“Back in the Game” sending high school football teams and media to Grey Cup

Mark’s pops up in Vancouver with football competition

CFL partner will test fans’ skills ahead of Grey Cup championship this month

UPDATED: Reitmans shutting down 107 Smart Set stores

Company to convert 31 stores to operate under other fashion brands

Home Depot faces dozens of lawsuits over data breach

Litigation may distract management and affect how the retailer runs its business

Aimia takes a data-dive for Canadian charities

Employees donate data analysis skills to not-for-profits in 24-hour event

Simons readies for major Canadian expansion

Montreal retailer announces plans to open stores in B.C., Alberta and Ontario into 2017

Brands gain momentum with multi-screen program

SPONSORED: How to tell impactful stories through video and across multiple platforms