Rogers replacing top marketers

John Boynton and Shelagh Stoneham are leaving the mobile and media company

Just weeks after completing a full creative agency review, Rogers Communications is making big changes to its marketing leadership, replacing two senior executives responsible for the brand.

Both John Boynton, executive vice-president marketing and chief marketing officer, and Shelagh Stoneham, senior vice-president and general manager, brands and marcomm, will be leaving the company effective immediately. The changes were revealed to Rogers staff late Wednesday afternoon.

The move comes just eight weeks after Rogers completed a three-month agency review that ended with the consolidation of most of its creative ad business with Publicis. The agency has held the English creative assignment since 2007. OMD remains the media agency of record for Rogers.

It’s also the first major change at the senior executive ranks since Guy Laurence took over as CEO of Rogers Communications in early December.

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