Starbucks diversifies at retail with first Evolution Fresh store

Starbucks is pushing beyond coffee with the opening of the first Evolution Fresh juice store, the company said Monday. Starbucks, which is looking for new businesses for growth, purchased the California-based juice maker in November for $30 million. Evolution Fresh had been selling its juices in grocery stores such as Whole Foods groceries. The first […]

Starbucks is pushing beyond coffee with the opening of the first Evolution Fresh juice store, the company said Monday.

Starbucks, which is looking for new businesses for growth, purchased the California-based juice maker in November for $30 million. Evolution Fresh had been selling its juices in grocery stores such as Whole Foods groceries. The first Evolution Fresh store is in Bellevue, Wash.

Aside from juices, Starbucks said Evolution Fresh shops will have wraps, soups, salads, vegetarian and vegan options and other offerings.

Evolution Fresh, started by Naked Juice founder Jimmy Rosenberg, is one of the few larger juice companies that still cracks, peels, presses and squeezes its own fruits and vegetables rather than using pureed or powdered ingredients. It also uses a process called high-pressure pasteurization to make the juice without heating it.

Starbucks sees these methods as a competitive edge over juice makers such as Odwalla or Naked Juice, which it currently carries in its stores. It said it allows Evolution Fresh to keep a higher nutritional quality in the juice while maintaining the taste.

Starbucks said Evolution Fresh drinks will make their way into Starbucks’ company-owned stores later this year. Evolution Fresh is also planning to add new seasonal and other juices to its product lineup.

Starbucks’ acquisition of Evolution Fresh is part of an attempt to broaden its business as consumers demand healthier products and it faces growing competition from the likes of McDonald’s and the Dunkin’ Donuts chain. The company has rolled out lower-calorie and lower-fat food options, sugar-free syrups and switched from whole milk to 2% milk as the default in its drinks.

Brands Articles

RBC puts a face to language services

Bank launches in-branch video interpretation app

The good and the bad of Sears’ reinvention plan

Retail experts weigh in on struggling retailer's latest turnaround efforts

Simons launches online-only home goods lines

Retailer aims to be a one-stop shop for decorating

Rogers Radio partners with Shazam on content play

Booster Juice signs on as the inaugural sponsors of The Shazam @ 7 Countdown

Canada Goose’s leader speaks on brand authenticity and growth

As firm opens new stores, CEO Dani Reiss says it's a company for all seasons

How Neal Brothers used colour blocking to freshen things up

Whole Foods said traditional packaging wouldn't resonate with shoppers

The unwritten rules of athletic endorsement deals (Column)

A recent cover shoot with Michael Phelps serves as a warning for brands

Walmart hints at the CEO-as-ad-star possibilities for brands

Doug McMillon is a pitchman with a proven sense of social media savvy