Starbucks to expand beer, wine sales at more cafes

Starbucks plans to turn more of its cafes into a destination for beer and wine in the evenings. The coffee company says it is looking to expand alcohol sales to “thousands of select stores” over the next several years, although it didn’t provide details on an exact timeline. The chain first offered beer and wine […]

Starbucks plans to turn more of its cafes into a destination for beer and wine in the evenings.

The coffee company says it is looking to expand alcohol sales to “thousands of select stores” over the next several years, although it didn’t provide details on an exact timeline.

The chain first offered beer and wine after 4 p.m. at one of its Seattle cafes in 2010. The drinks are now in about 26 cafes, with plans to reach 40 by the end of the year. The cafes with alcohol also serve a variety of small dishes, such as bacon-wrapped dates and flatbreads.

It’s part of Starbucks’ push to boost sales after the morning rush hour. It’s a common concept in the restaurant industry – figuring out ways to maximize sales throughout the day since stores have to pay for rent and labour anyway.

Taco Bell, for instance, recently started highlighting snacks in its ads to drive sales during the slower late afternoon hours. And the fruit shakes and other drinks at McDonald’s are seen as a way to attract people throughout the day.

As for Starbucks Corp., the chain recently introduced new sandwiches and salads to boost sales in the afternoon. It’s also branching out into other areas to as it faces more competition in the coffee market.

The company recently purchased a chain of tea shops called Teavana. CEO Howard Schultz has said he wants to make tea as popular in the U.S. as he’s helped make coffee.

Brands Articles

Airbnb names North Strategic PR agency of record

U.S.-based online hospitality company works to build awareness in Canada

CTV’s content-driven approach to PR

Pairing traditional press releases with quirky, Buzzfeed-inspired lists

Home Depot data breach brings class action suit

Big box retailer joins others dealing with life after the hack

Campbell Company gives soup products a facelift

Heritage brands reformulated and repackaged for contemporary tastes

‘Crave More’ attempts to make PC a lifestyle brand

New campaign from John St. asks a lot of questions

DDB Canada is a good fit for Nordstrom’s shoe campaign

Agency's Calgary campaign impressed the U.S. marketers

Ethnic insights at the heart of a total market strategy

Asking 'which cultural group should I target?' may put you on the wrong path