Tea Emporium rebrands, touts owner’s expertise

The Tea Emporium unveiled a new logo and website last week as part of a rebranding effort. The new look follows a change in ownership at the Toronto-based company, which sells specialty tea. Shabnam Weber founded the Tea Emporium with her husband, Frank Weber, in 2000, but bought out his share of the company in […]

The Tea Emporium unveiled a new logo and website last week as part of a rebranding effort.

The new look follows a change in ownership at the Toronto-based company, which sells specialty tea. Shabnam Weber founded the Tea Emporium with her husband, Frank Weber, in 2000, but bought out his share of the company in May.

The brand’s redesign, its first since its founding, was handled by Issha Marie Onoya, a former Tea Emporium employee who now works as a photographer. Weber said she wanted to modernize the look and asked Onoya for a elegant, classic style.

Shabnam Weber

As part of the re-branding, Weber intends to make herself the  face of the company. Now that she is the sole owner, that’s an easier process.  “You’re able to inject your identity to a much greater extent when it’s only you,” Weber said.

Weber considers herself a long-time tea expert, which she wants to now communicate to consumers. She is the director of the Tea Association of Canada and created a ‘Tea Sommelier’ program that is taught at colleges across Canada.

“It’s now about the consumer having someone to identify.” Weber said.

The Tea Emporium has four locations, including a capsule shop inside of the Loblaws in Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. It also sells tea wholesale to over 30 vendors across Ontario.

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