Tim Hortons gets nostalgic with latest anniversary effort

As part of its 50th anniversary, Tim Hortons is letting consumers chose which of five classic food items to put back on its menu for its “Bring it Back” campaign. Ahead of the coffee chain’s “official” birthday on May 17, it is unveiling one of the five items in contention every Thursday at TimsBringitBack.ca, starting […]

As part of its 50th anniversary, Tim Hortons is letting consumers chose which of five classic food items to put back on its menu for its “Bring it Back” campaign.

Back from the grave?

Ahead of the coffee chain’s “official” birthday on May 17, it is unveiling one of the five items in contention every Thursday at TimsBringitBack.ca, starting with this week’s reveal of the chocolate-toped and cream-filled Ă©clair to represent the 1960s.

Then, from May 1 – 14, Canadians are asked to vote daily for their favorite retro item. The winner will be announced May 15 and make its limited-time return to stores later in 2014.

“For 50 years, Tim Hortons has been updating its menu to suit the evolving tastes and preferences of our guests, and with that, some menu items have come and gone, yet we continue to receive requests to bring back beloved menu items,” says Glenn Hollis, Tim Hortons’ vice-president of marketing, in a release.

“Bring It Back is our way of saying thank you to our loyal guests for the past five decades,” he says. “We hope it sparks fond memories for Canadians and Tim Hortons employees from coast to coast.”

Ogilvy One is overseeing this campaign with Tim Hortons.

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