Toronto mayor responds to Psynex PR stunt

He’s under constant fire from the media, but at least Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has kept his sense of humour. In September, Mayor Ford was sent free samples of Focusyl, a new product from Psynex Pharmaceuticals that claim to make users “more focused and productive.” The samples were part of a promotional campaign from the […]

He’s under constant fire from the media, but at least Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has kept his sense of humour.

In September, Mayor Ford was sent free samples of Focusyl, a new product from Psynex Pharmaceuticals that claim to make users “more focused and productive.” The samples were part of a promotional campaign from the Publicis-owned agency Red Lion that saw samples go to other celebrities demonstrating less-than-attentive behaviour.

Ford received his dose after he was photographed reading while driving.

Brett Channer, president of Red Lion, sent Marketing notice that Ford had actually responded to the campaign. After thanking Psynex’ Michael Buckley for the samples, Ford wrote that “once in a while, even I can use a little boost in my mental performance.” (The full letter is below).

As spokesman for the mayor’s office confirms the letter is real, but stressed that “it’s just a simple thank-you letter,” and not an endorsement of the product.

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Marketing is doubtful Buckley will receive similar thanks from Vladimir Putin.

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