Under Armour sues Nike over use of “I will” in campaigns

Under Armour wants to protect its “I will” catchphrase. The athletic clothing maker has filed a trademark infringement suit against Nike, claiming its rival has inappropriately used variations of the phrase in its marketing. Under Armour said that since late last year, Nike has launched an advertising campaign using phrases like “I will protect my […]

Under Armour wants to protect its “I will” catchphrase. The athletic clothing maker has filed a trademark infringement suit against Nike, claiming its rival has inappropriately used variations of the phrase in its marketing.

Under Armour said that since late last year, Nike has launched an advertising campaign using phrases like “I will protect my home court,” and “I will finish what I started.”

Under Amour says such use of “I will” is “likely to cause confusion, mistake, and deception.” Under Amour said that it has been using its “I will” phrase on hundreds of products, packaging and various types of marketing since as early as 1998.

In an email response to Associated Press, Nike spokeswoman Mary Remuzzi declined to comment at this time, saying the company just learned of the lawsuit.

According to the documents, Under Armour is requesting a permanent injunction to bar Nike from using the “I will” phrase. It is also wants Nike to destroy all products, packaging and signs that use the tagline. It also wants Nike to pay Under Armour all profits arising from the use of the phrase, and is seeking to recoup damages.

The suit was filed Thursday in federal court in Baltimore.

Brands Articles

Moneris predicts the (almost) end of cash

Survey finds 25% of young Canadians prefer paying with a mobile wallet

Coca-Cola brings mid-calorie drink to Canada

Naturally sweetened 'Life' brand launches with extensive campaign

Marie Callender’s aims to free moms of mealtime guilt

ConAgra-owned frozen entrée brand launches campaign with real moms

Ace Bakery rises up with first campaign

'Discover Great Bread' is based on consumer truths about bread

Activia brand positioning shifts from function to emotion

Canadian rollout relies heavily on digital to court millennial women

Snapchat drops the ‘chat’

Company also introduces new 'Spectacles' product

An agency exec makes the case for artists in the boardroom

Ron Tite offers CMOs a perfect roadmap for organizational creativity

Canadian CMOs open up about their 2017 priorities

Execs from Rogers, the AGO, Canadian Olympic Committee share the MES stage

Air Canada surprises Americans with 48 hours in Toronto

The brand's latest campaign aims to make Toronto a desirable layover stop