Visa launches new online checkout service

Replacing V.me, new service eliminates typing in card numbers

Payment processor Visa is launching a new service called Visa Checkout that eliminates a few steps in online payment.

The company and its retailing partners, including Neiman Marcus, Pizza Hut, Staples and others, hope a quicker payout will lead to fewer abandoned shopping carts online. As more customers shop on smaller screens like smartphones and tablets, the hassle of entering in credit card numbers and billing addresses is becoming a sticking point and payment processors have been working to find ways to simplify the process.

Beginning Wednesday, users can sign up with Visa credit and debit cards, as well as other branded cards, and enter their card information just once. Then they will be able pay for things via Visa by only entering their username and password at participating sites. The service is currently being offered in the U.S., Canada and Australia.

Visa Checkout joins similar services like eBay‘s PayPal, MasterCard‘s MasterPass, Amazon‘s one-click checkout and others. It’s not Visa’s first effort. In 2012, Visa launched a similar V.me service, which Visa Checkout is replacing.

V.me was being used by about 300 retailers like 1-800-Flowers and AutoZone, which are all switching over to the new service. But Visa says its Visa Checkout is an improvement, with a more recognizable name, streamlined functionality and more of a focus on larger retailers.

It also functions as a pop-up window on a retailers’ site rather the directing users to another window. Major banks that issue Visa cards including Chase, Citi and Wells Fargo are also supporting it.

Visa has been working to expand its reach into the payments processing business with new products like Visa Checkout. The company is also opening a technology centre in San Francisco in an effort to court mobile developers in the Bay Area tech community. It plans to hire 100 new technology staffers for the centre.

Brands Articles

How Sears is addressing the ‘elephant in the room’

And, why it's sticking to the middle sector as more retailers move upmarket

Kraft’s simple solution for building a coffee brand

Nabob campaign mocks modern coffee culture and celebrates the humble cup of joe

How Pabst Blue Ribbon earned its hipster cred

The blue-collar beer set its sights on a target as individual as the brand

Rotman School’s Bernardo Blum tackles big data disappointment

Data-Driven keynote says companies are using data for description, not solutions

Royal Roads University gives students a look into the future

School replaces traditional advertising with aggressive social and digital campaign

Kashi Canada’s quest to ‘Plant it Forward’

Health food brand gets Canadians closer to real food with urban garden project

Maple Leaf Foods launches ‘Songs in the Key of Wiener’

Facebook campaign for Larsen Wieners pays homage to the “As Seen On TV” era