FORESTA-LUMINA-1

Watch This: Moment Factory lights up Parc de la Gorge

Turning a park into a glowing, immersive, multimedia experience to convince hikers to stay the night

Montreal-based Moment Factory has been making a name for itself as one of the industry’s most dynamic live event studios. The company has put its unique multimedia talents to work for big brands like Cirque du Soleil, Madonna, Disney, Nine Inch Nails and Microsoft—usually at big events in urban settings. Its most recent effort used a provincial park as the canvas.

Parc de la Gorge de Coaticook in Quebec’s Eastern Townships attracts approximately 100,000 tourists each year, but most of them are day-trippers. Moment Factory was tasked with creating an immersive nighttime experience in the park that would give those day-trippers reason to stay past sundown, sleep over and hopefully spend some extra time in the area.

Moment Factory came up with Foresta Lumina, an illuminated, two-kilometre walk through the forest, inspired by the area’s myths and legends.

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