Watch This: Panic at the yoga studio (Krispy Kernels)

Montreal agency LG2 has already proven its comedy instincts are Cannes-worthy. In terms of off-the-wall comedy, there’s a straight line to be drawn from the bronze-winning “Couch” to this spot (which we think is called “Zen”). Like many other brands, Krispy Kernels has become expert at making one commercial serve both English and French speakers […]

Montreal agency LG2 has already proven its comedy instincts are Cannes-worthy. In terms of off-the-wall comedy, there’s a straight line to be drawn from the bronze-winning “Couch” to this spot (which we think is called “Zen”).

Like many other brands, Krispy Kernels has become expert at making one commercial serve both English and French speakers in Quebec. Swap the voiceover et voila, your film shoot becomes bilingual.

Agency: LG2
Copywriter: Andrée-Anne Hallé
Art directors: Luc Du Sault, Andrée-Anne Hallé
Creative director: Luc Du Sault
Director: François Lallier
Production House: Nova Film
Producer: Simon Corriveau
Sound Design: Boogie Studio

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