Weekend Essentials – April 25, 2014

Here’s what we learned this week Frank & Oak are onto something online E-retail is booming in North America. With more and more delivery-box-style businesses popping up, we’re happy to see a Canadian creation laying the groundwork for prolonged success. “In just two years, Frank & Oak has emerged as a leader of the pack; […]

Here’s what we learned this week

Frank & Oak are onto something online

E-retail is booming in North America. With more and more delivery-box-style businesses popping up, we’re happy to see a Canadian creation laying the groundwork for prolonged success.

“In just two years, Frank & Oak has emerged as a leader of the pack; a 100-plus-person operation with more than 1.1 million members. The brand has broken through with American consumers with 70% of its sales in the U.S., a third of which are in California. Frank & Oak doesn’t release financial earnings, but says it’s ‘well on its way to being profitable.’ It also says it ships more than 35,000 orders a month and that typically those orders contain two to three items each, usually including a shirt and a pair of pants. Even a modest assumption of $100 an order suggests that after 24 months in business, Frank & Oak is on its way to being a $50-million-a-year brand.”
• Read More in Frank & Oak knows what men want

Kraft Peanut Butter shifted its tone, and it’s great

It still amazes us that run-of-the-mill “bread and butter” (pun!) products can wow us with great ads. Hovis nailed it a few years ago for something as simple as a loaf of bread, and Kraft seems to have done the same with their latest work for peanut butter. Kraft’s TV efforts last year were decidedly less cinematic, but laid the foundation for the through-the-ages idea that blossoms in Taxi 2’s latest.
• Read More in Kraft Peanut Butter spreads the love with new campaign

Luke Sklar says Tangerine’s new name might not matter much

The Sklar Wilton & Associates partner says “in multiple studies, we have found consumers don’t care about the name of the brand and sometimes don’t even remember it. That’s not to say that brands don’t have differentiated assets they can leverage. In this case the colour orange is clearly a bright, fresh property worth exploiting. More deeply, maintaining the stance of a classic challenger brand is a must-have to ensure happy customers and to attract new ones. A brand is about behaviours and the promise to help save money and bring new ways to challenge stodgy banking conventions is exactly the right stance. This brand doctor is 100% impressed with this first step in re-staging ING Direct.”
• Read More in Brand Doctor: Is the Tangerine rebranding working?

Brands Articles

Coke targets foodies as consumers dodge sodas

As tastes evolve, Coke says it can be paired with more than pizza and wings

SoFresh embraces its Canuck roots

A dairy alternative brand tries to make its U.S.-grown ingredients more Canadian

Plan Canada refreshes Gifts of Hope

Annual giving campaign positioned as perfect gift for the hard-to-shop-for

Amazon unveils a store with no checkout

Sensors register shoppers' items and automatically charge them to Amazon app

Wake-Ups return after 65-year advertising slumber

A caffeine pill with broad consumer market ambitions

Pickle Barrel shows local food some love

Why the Ontario casual dining brand upped its focus on fresh ingredients

Tourisme Montreal apologizes in advance

The city's 375th birthday celebrations will likely wake the neighbours all year

Baton Rouge introduces revamped restaurant format

Ontario location the first to get new look of 18 planned through 2018

The bear necessities of Freedom’s rebranding

With a new name and mascot, a challenger telco takes a softer approach