Weekend Essentials – April 25, 2014

Here’s what we learned this week Frank & Oak are onto something online E-retail is booming in North America. With more and more delivery-box-style businesses popping up, we’re happy to see a Canadian creation laying the groundwork for prolonged success. “In just two years, Frank & Oak has emerged as a leader of the pack; […]

Here’s what we learned this week

Frank & Oak are onto something online

E-retail is booming in North America. With more and more delivery-box-style businesses popping up, we’re happy to see a Canadian creation laying the groundwork for prolonged success.

“In just two years, Frank & Oak has emerged as a leader of the pack; a 100-plus-person operation with more than 1.1 million members. The brand has broken through with American consumers with 70% of its sales in the U.S., a third of which are in California. Frank & Oak doesn’t release financial earnings, but says it’s ‘well on its way to being profitable.’ It also says it ships more than 35,000 orders a month and that typically those orders contain two to three items each, usually including a shirt and a pair of pants. Even a modest assumption of $100 an order suggests that after 24 months in business, Frank & Oak is on its way to being a $50-million-a-year brand.”
• Read More in Frank & Oak knows what men want

Kraft Peanut Butter shifted its tone, and it’s great

It still amazes us that run-of-the-mill “bread and butter” (pun!) products can wow us with great ads. Hovis nailed it a few years ago for something as simple as a loaf of bread, and Kraft seems to have done the same with their latest work for peanut butter. Kraft’s TV efforts last year were decidedly less cinematic, but laid the foundation for the through-the-ages idea that blossoms in Taxi 2′s latest.
• Read More in Kraft Peanut Butter spreads the love with new campaign

Luke Sklar says Tangerine’s new name might not matter much

The Sklar Wilton & Associates partner says “in multiple studies, we have found consumers don’t care about the name of the brand and sometimes don’t even remember it. That’s not to say that brands don’t have differentiated assets they can leverage. In this case the colour orange is clearly a bright, fresh property worth exploiting. More deeply, maintaining the stance of a classic challenger brand is a must-have to ensure happy customers and to attract new ones. A brand is about behaviours and the promise to help save money and bring new ways to challenge stodgy banking conventions is exactly the right stance. This brand doctor is 100% impressed with this first step in re-staging ING Direct.”
• Read More in Brand Doctor: Is the Tangerine rebranding working?

Brands Articles

Bonin Bough’s digital lessons for marketers

The Mondelēz marketer shares lessons from the front lines of digital marketing

Mark’s wants #EverythingInJeans

A new campaign from Sid Lee

McDonald’s to sell packaged coffee in the U.S.

QSR to highlight coffee in restaurants

Elle partners with Hudson’s Bay on shoppable videos

#Shopyourmood 'closes the loop' for editor Noreen Flanagan

Porter Gale’s five trends to watch for

A look ahead from a former Virgin marketing exec

Indulgent dessert Danette arrives in Canada

International hit arrives in Canadian grocery stores

Gap takes Casting Call to social media

Online contest gets an upgrade for more back-to-school engagement

Moneris to offer e-gift card solution to merchants

Virtual gift cards growing to $11 billion market in the U.S.