Wheat Board’s vintage cowgirl ad lassoes controversy

The women’s president of the National Farmers Union is questioning what an image of a long-legged woman straddling a fence has to do with selling grain. The picture is part of a new advertisement from the Canadian Wheat Board that is kicking up a ruckus on the Prairies. The ad features a 1969 print called […]

The women’s president of the National Farmers Union is questioning what an image of a long-legged woman straddling a fence has to do with selling grain.

The picture is part of a new advertisement from the Canadian Wheat Board that is kicking up a ruckus on the Prairies.

The ad features a 1969 print called “Hi-Ho, Sliver,” which shows a young woman in a cowboy hat and skirt straddling a fence.

The caption says “Still on the fence?” and encourages farmers to choose the wheat board for marketing grain.

Joan Brady, who heads the women’s branch of the farmers union, said the ad is offensive and is likely to cause farmers to steer clear of the wheat board.

Producers are now choosing how to market their grain because legislation has ended the board’s marketing monopoly.

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