Wheat Board’s vintage cowgirl ad lassoes controversy

The women’s president of the National Farmers Union is questioning what an image of a long-legged woman straddling a fence has to do with selling grain. The picture is part of a new advertisement from the Canadian Wheat Board that is kicking up a ruckus on the Prairies. The ad features a 1969 print called […]

The women’s president of the National Farmers Union is questioning what an image of a long-legged woman straddling a fence has to do with selling grain.

The picture is part of a new advertisement from the Canadian Wheat Board that is kicking up a ruckus on the Prairies.

The ad features a 1969 print called “Hi-Ho, Sliver,” which shows a young woman in a cowboy hat and skirt straddling a fence.

The caption says “Still on the fence?” and encourages farmers to choose the wheat board for marketing grain.

Joan Brady, who heads the women’s branch of the farmers union, said the ad is offensive and is likely to cause farmers to steer clear of the wheat board.

Producers are now choosing how to market their grain because legislation has ended the board’s marketing monopoly.

Brands Articles

The case for companies staying off social media

It takes real commitment and, for many, it's just not worth the trouble

KitchenAid’s gingerbread social spectacle

A social media strategy for the holiday season pops up in Toronto

Coke targets foodies as consumers dodge sodas

As tastes evolve, Coke says it can be paired with more than pizza and wings

SoFresh embraces its Canuck roots

A dairy alternative brand tries to make its U.S.-grown ingredients more Canadian

Plan Canada refreshes Gifts of Hope

Annual giving campaign positioned as perfect gift for the hard-to-shop-for

Amazon unveils a store with no checkout

Sensors register shoppers' items and automatically charge them to Amazon app

Wake-Ups return after 65-year advertising slumber

A caffeine pill with broad consumer market ambitions

Pickle Barrel shows local food some love

Why the Ontario casual dining brand upped its focus on fresh ingredients

Tourisme Montreal apologizes in advance

The city's 375th birthday celebrations will likely wake the neighbours all year