Brands + Trust: Hearts vs. Minds (Consumerology)

Consumerology tracks emotional vs. rational considerations for trust

Trust among consumers has headed in the wrong direction over the past five years, according to the latest Consumerology report commissioned by Bensimon Byrne. Marketers, take special note, the slide is more pronounced among women, whom we all know are the prime decision-makers in household spending: 54% are less trusting of companies versus 42% among men, according to the latest research. The good news is the slide isn’t deep and younger consumers are more likely to cut you some slack.

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Methodology: The report is based on a survey of 1,513 Canadians proportionate in makeup to the broader population, in English and French, between Feb. 25 and March 3. It has a margin of error of +- 2.5% 19 times out of 20.

This story originally appeared in the May 2014 issue of Marketing, available to subscribers and on the iPad newsstand.

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