Consumer Insights: Digital puts the awe into out-of-home (Infographic)

Digital signage is now the second fastest-growing ad medium in the world

Digital is arguably the biggest technological advancement to hit the out-of-home industry since the 1796 perfection of the lithographic process gave rise to the illustrated poster—a direct antecedent of today’s billboard.

According to the Outdoor Advertising Association of America, the first digital billboards were installed around 2005. In the past decade, digital boards have appeared in just about every conceivable out-of-home (OOH) location: bars and restaurants, colleges and universities, arenas and fitness clubs.

Perhaps no other traditional advertising medium has successfully reinvented itself for modern marketing. Digital signage is now the second fastest-growing ad medium in the world. In 12 of 15 national markets studied by PQ Media, digital OOH (DOOH) was second only to mobile as measured by the average weekly exposure to consumers.

This story originally appeared in the May 2014 issue of Marketing

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