How Mogo is reaching millennials

Financial brand makes a splash with sexy ads and wine-fuelled educational events

Mogo_Sexy_campaign_bus_shelter_pro-8-1Mogo, a Vancouver-based digital financial brand, has launched a new campaign the company says is “NSFBB” (not suitable for big banks).

Print ads, which are appearing in print and online on Postmedia properties, feature attention-getting headlines like “It’s so hot when she’s on top of her bills,” “I’m so glad he pulled out of debt in time” and “Will it hurt the first time I check my credit score?”

Mogo is aiming to speak to millennials in a way a traditional bank wouldn’t be able to, said director of marketing Stephanie Leakey.

“We launched these ads about thoughts that millennials would have and related it to personal finance,” she said. “We’re excited about creating that conversation in a really edgy, relevant way.”

Leakey said so far, the ads have been met with both positive and negative feedback. The company’s response to those who think the ads are offensive is: “We actually think the big bank CEO salaries, that are millions of dollars a year, is kind of offensive,” said Leakey.Mogo_Sexy_campaign_bus_shelter_pro-8-4

The print ads are part of a collaboration with Postmedia that was announced in January. The deal gives Mogo $50 million in media space over three years across Postmedia’s print, online and mobile platforms, while Postmedia gets a share of Mogo’s revenue and equity participation.

Leakey said the deal “enables Mogo to have this massive reach across Canada,” and includes advertising, content marketing and access to events. For instance, in February, Mogo sponsored the 2016 Maxim All-Star party in Toronto, which was hosted by Shaquille O’Neal and featured a performance by Snoop Dogg.

Mogo also holds events of its own. Last year, it launched a cross-Canada financial education series called “Adulting 101.” The events, which are hosted by Mogo’s “financial fitness coach,” Chantel Chapman, blend wine tasting and conversations about finance.

“It gives financial education to our millennial subset in a way that they can relate to,” said Leakey. “We really want to do things that are different, un-bank-like and do it in a way that’s fun.”

 

 

 

 

 

Add a comment

You must be to comment.

Consumer Articles

Ethnic retailing is moving from niche to mainstream

Canadian consumers are changing, but too few retailers are paying attention

Increased demand drives Grocery Gateway’s growth

Longo's CEO says online grocery shopping has 'come of age'

Localize labels talk to consumers about food sourcing

QR codes and a scoring system tell Ottawa shoppers where they're buying from

Consumer shifts put retail hiring at record low

Online shopping and automation means fewer positions to be filled on the floor

A CEO’s tips for using DIY video in consumer marketing (Column)

Vidyard's Michael Litt argues against outdated 'text tunnel vision'

What ‘customer centricity’ means to me

The season of giving is a good reminder to keep giving back

More Canadians to cross the border for Black Friday

UPS study shows many more Canadians shopping online or in store in the U.S.

Natrel whips up lactose-free butter option

Agropur Dairy to promote product with digital and in-store campaigns

Cold-FX class action lawsuit over misleading ads thrown out

Judge says Vancouver man couldn't effectively prove his claim