CBS mulling Netflix production deal

American television network CBS has said it may start producing content for Netflix. “When you look at the Netflixes of the world and the Amazons of the world doing new production, we welcome that,” CBS CEO Les Moonves told analysts during an earnings call. “We are talking to Netflix about a potential deal to produce […]

American television network CBS has said it may start producing content for Netflix.

“When you look at the Netflixes of the world and the Amazons of the world doing new production, we welcome that,” CBS CEO Les Moonves told analysts during an earnings call.

“We are talking to Netflix about a potential deal to produce a show for them. Until they are doing 22 hours a week of premium content, we don’t look at them as a competitor but rather another place to put our content, whether it’s original or buying our libraries as they have.”

CBS declined to elaborate further on any production plans.

Networks have been supplying library content – typically a few seasons old – to Netflix, Amazon and other platforms for streaming. They have been highly profitable deals. The possibility of CBS’s producing new content that would air exclusively on Netflix could create another opportunity for broadcast and cable networks to team up with streaming services.

But there has also been concern that Netflix, Amazon and Hulu will eventually cannibalize viewership. Some analysts believe that Nickelodeon’s recent ratings decline resulted from kids programming on Netflix, although both Nickelodeon parent Viacom and Netflix both dismiss any connection.

Netflix and Hulu have been trying hard to differentiate themselves with original programming. Netflix launched its first series, Lilyhammer, this month and is backing another original series, “Orange is the New Black,” Bloomberg reported this week. Netflix previously signed on for the original Kevin Spacey drama, House of Cards, and the revival of Arrested Development.

Hulu has also been beefing up its original content, introducing The Fashion Fund and Battleground this month.

Amazon could also be entering the fray. It is looking for talent to create original programming through its People’s Production Co., according to Amazon’s job site. The company seeks a creative executive to “help develop half-hour comedies for online and tradition distribution,” as well as a creative director to develop half-hour children’s series.

To read the original article in Advertising Age, click here.

Media Articles

6 takeaways from the Brightroll Video Summit

Panelists covered everything digital, video and mobile

Bell Media launches video streaming service

"Project Latte" will include the entire HBO scripted off-air library

Toronto Crime Stoppers shed light on contraband tobacco

Public awareness campaign asks citizens to take action

UPDATED: Rogers and Vice Media enter $100-million partnership

Media companies to produce Canadian-focused content for mobile, web and TV

A revisionist’s recent history of TV and internet advertising (Column)

Traditional TV has done a poor job of defending itself against false perceptions that ad spend is shifting dramatically. The danger is these perceptions can lead marketers to invest against that change, making it a reality

Digital magazine readership on the rise: PMB

Digital readership increases by more than 50% in the past year

Nearly half of Canadians read a newspaper each day: NADbank

Digital-only readership is just 11%, but growing among younger demographics

CTV/CMA announce judges for Super Bowl ad challenge

Winning ad will air during CTV’s Feb. 1 telecast of Super Bowl XLIX

TSN unveils online store

New venture isn’t intended to compete with established online merchants, but round out the online experience for TSN.ca users