CRTC makes do not call registration permanent

More than 12 million numbers are currently registered

It’s no longer just diamonds that are forever. The CRTC announced today that registration with its six-year-old National Do Not Call List (DNCL) will be permanent.

Number registrations had previously been for a set amount of time, after which Canadians were required to re-register their number.

The federal regulator said that the decision enhances its ability to “protect the privacy of Canadians from unwanted telemarketing calls.”

More than 12 million numbers are currently registered with the DNCL, with an average of 1,200 numbers added every day. Since the creation of the DNCL in 2008, the CRTC has conducted 1,200 investigations and imposed nearly $4 million in penalties against companies violating the order.

“The National DNCL was created to respect the wishes of Canadians who do not want to receive any more telemarketing calls,” said CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais in a release. “It therefore makes sense that registration be made permanent in order to spare Canadians the inconvenience of having to re-register their number on the list.

“We are pursuing our efforts to ensure that telemarketers respect the wishes of Canadians.”

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